Framing Insts

[ pdf at bottom of page you can print out ]

Here are some framing instructions, I have also added a pdf that you can print off and provide to your framer if need be.  Good and proper framing will assure a long life for you fine art print.

FINE ART PRINT FRAMING

Bruce Barry

www.brucebarryart.com

Below are framing instructions and other information regarding your Fine Art Prints that you can refer to, or give to your framer, as it contains information about your print substrate and the printing pigments that good framers may wish to know.

PROPER FRAMING ASSURES LONG TERM ENJOYMENT OF YOUR FINE ART PRINT & YOUR INVESTMENT.

PAPER:

Your fine art print was reproduced on acid free, cold pressed, 100% cotton rag fine art paper with a weight of 305 GSM (g/m2) (gm/square meter) which provides archival print media for this reproduction. Manufacturer states the image ought last 500 to 600 years.

ARCHIVAL PIGMENT INK:

The original painting was reproduced on the rag paper with archival pigment ink, not chemical ink, at 1440 dpi (drops per inch), consequently this paper yields brilliant colours and deep darks. This allows good reproduction of paynes grey which I use, as opposed to black, as the paynes grey gives a warmer dark colour value. Great care and time has been taken to assure matching hues on your print and the original.

FIX-IT:

This Art Print has NOT been sprayed with a FIX-IT [‘workable’ or otherwise] or any other coating type image shield.

MATTING:

This all-rag, none wood pulp paper will last for hundreds of years with proper care if rag conservation board with a pH factor of 7.5 is used behind your Fine Art Print. Conjointly the front mat ought be of the same pH factor. While this may seem minor, it is very important. If the front mat is not archival preservation board, it is necessary to line the inside of your front mat with 4-ply rag conservation board.

This print is not only for esthetics, it is also an investment. It is very critical that only all-rag, pH 7.5 acid-free materials come in contact with your print at any point. This includes the hinges, which are the cloth folds that hold your print in suspension under the mat. The asset value of your fine art print is affected if the original condition of the print is altered in any way.

HAZARD OF INADEQUATE CASING/FRAMING:

Improper matting is responsible for much of the damage to fine art on paper. Corrosion and discolouration is usually the result of inexpensive and readily available wood pulp mat board. Ask for conservation archival matting board that is trustworthy to use in framing your print. While unprocessed wood pulp based mats are cheaper, even a very minute fraction of unprocessed wood pulp in the mounting board or mat may contain acids that will "burn" the print paper, cause it to turn brown and become brittle.

Over time well-known and very expensive works have been removed from improper framing only to disintegrate. You will find that experienced museum curators and art aficionados who deal with the preservation of collector prints require special conservation techniques in framing.

NO DRY-MOUNTING OR PASTING – NONE:

The print ought never be permanently secured to the mounting board by any method – they have all been tried and do not work – it will destroy your print. Only hinges or corner flanges made from archival quality, acid-free materials must be used to attach the art pieces to the mounting board, and thus permit the print to be easily removed if necessary for remounting in the future.

 

GIVE IT AIR:

For purposes of allowing air circulation, it is important that the framed print not be flat up against the wall when hung. One way of dealing with this inexpensively is to take a standard wine bottle cork and cut it into four equal pieces then glue them to the back of the finished, framed piece to place it 3/8" to 1/2" from the wall, allowing air to circulate. The frequently used synthetic bumpers made for this objective typically are oftimes not long enough.

WHERE TO HANG THE OBJECT:

Certain environmental conditions can over the years cause serious damage to works of art which have been properly framed.

Light:, Direct and indirect sunlight, and fluorescent (tube) lighting, are both rich in ultra-violet rays and are as a result detrimental to paper as well as some inks and colours. Rooms where works of art are to be hung should have a weak daylight and deserve to be illuminated with incandescent lighting, which is relatively harmless.

Heat: Do not hang works of art near radiators or other sources of heat or on walls which contain flues in the wall itself. These dangers do require years of exposure, but fine art becomes a companion and like in life, it is the valued and secure trusted companions that are part of the wine of life.

PDF FOR YOU TO PRINT OUT AS REQUIRED

Fine Art Istructions (947 KB)